Excavated  Silver ID badge of James A. Barrows
Present at Antietam, the Battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville then Gettysburg,  Musician Barrows would have been detailed as a litter bearer as was
the custom for members of the Regimental Band.  Barrows remained in service to the 16th throughout the Civil War as they saw action at such as the
Battles of the Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spotsylvania and Spotsylvania Court House as well as Totopotomoy, Cold Harbor, the Petersburg Siege, the Battle
of the Mine Explosion and finally the actions of the Appomattox Campaign concluding with Appomattox Court
Excavated Silver ID badge of Andrews S. Abrum
Abrums was a 20 year old Gorham, Maine native when he joined the 16th Maine Infantry on August 14, 1862.  
Two months later he would be detached to serve with the 2nd Maine Battery, Maine Mounted Artillery.  In the
thick of it with Dow’s 2nd Maine Battery  at Gettysburg, would be recorded as missing in action until it had been
established that he had been taken prisoner.  He was imprisoned in Richmond till he died of fever in a Confederate
hospital on 11/27.1863.   His identification badge shown here was recovered by a skilled relic hunter with the aid
of a modern day metal detector. (published in:  Rebels & Yankees the Battlefields of the Civil War  by Wm. C.
Davis - p. 100 & 101)        
A precursor to the modern military dog tag, such badges were fashioned from die struck sheet silver in various patriotic patterns and
purchased as blanks by regimental sutlers who sold them to soldiers in the field.  Letter and number die stamps were maintained to
mark the badge to his customer.
A rare half plate tintype captures the image of members
of Co. A 16th Maine in the field with arms at the ready.   
Taken just prior to the Battle of Gettysburg, an old family
notation identifies the young man indicated at center
front, as Albert J. and his fellows of Co. A were already
veterans of Antietam and Fredericksburg, the infamous
Mud March and the horrors of Chancellorsville.  A short
while after the photographers visit,
Pvt. Albert Murch
would be one of sixty-five members of his regiment
captured at Gettysburg.  The regiment lost 148 men,
killed, wounded & captured in the three day fight.  The
Bloody 16th was down to 275 officers his regiment only
to be captured yet again at Weldon Railroad, Virginia.   
Murch was among 83 enlisted men and three line officers
of the 16th Maine along with its commander Colonel
Tilden himself, to be captured here.  Col. Tilden and Lt.
Davies together escaped the enemy’s clutches within
twenty-four hours.   Imprisoned earlier at Libby, this was
the second POW escape for the wily Colonel Tilden.  Not
so fortunate Pvt. Albert Murch would die of disease as a
POW at Salisbury, N.C., January 6, 1865.
Silver ID badge of: H. ROSCO BRACKETT
Barrows was a resident of Peru, Maine in the spring of 1862 when he threw his lot in with the boys of Co. C,
16th Maine Volunteer Infantry.   Present at Antietam, the Battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville then
Gettysburg,  Musician Barrows would have been detailed as a litter bearer as was the custom for members of
the Regimental Band.  Barrows remained in service to the 16th throughout the Civil War as they saw action at
such as the Battles of the Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spotsylvania and Spotsylvania Court House as well as
Totopotomoy, Cold Harbor, the Petersburg Siege, the Battle of the Mine Explosion and finally the actions of
the Appomattox Campaign concluding with Appomattox Court House, the surrender Lee and his army then the
Grand Review in Washington D. C.
PAGE 45
PAGES